Patapedia River

(Kedgwick and the Restigouche too!)

May 21-25, 2009

The Crew

The Patapedia Crew

We started out in Fredericton with a crew of six.  We loaded up the trailer with our packs and canoes in the hot spring sun and headed North.  We drove for four  hours to a campsite in Kedgwick where we stopped for the night by the river.

Patapedia River Sunrise

Patapedia River Sunrise

In the morning we got up and headed literally around the corner to where our journey began: André Arpin’s place – Canoe Restigouche.  There we met our skilled guide, Roland.  We got back in the truck and drove on the back roads now for another hour and a half.  The road itself was in good shape, but the recent wind storm had knocked down many trees that bullied us to one side of the road or the other.

Road Less Traveled

Road Less Traveled

Read the rest of this entry »

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Patapedia (Continued)

On to the Kedgwick River

Once we got back to Arpin’s we rendezvoused with Kathleen and Patrick who would be joining us for the Kedgwick portion of the trip.  We reloaded te trailer with four canoes and all of our gear and all seven of us piled into the Land Cruiser and once again, hit the dusty trails.

Reload

Reload

Roland's Fluffy Companions

Roland's Fluffy Companions

Close Quarters

Close Quarters

Our put in site on the Kedgwick River was at the Kedgwick Forks, where there was a spacious loading area. Read the rest of this entry »

Turtle Mountain

May 31, 2009

Turtle Mountain

Turtle Mountain

Turtle Mountain

May 16, 2009

Paul Maybee

Ross Curtner

Graham Waugh

Setting Out
Setting Out

We set out for Turtle Mountain at around 10:30 am by the side of the highway.  We have a vague idea of where we were going and the directions are patchy at best.  I am with my good friend Graham Waugh of Local Motion and his friend, and my new friend Ross Curtner.

Through the Gate
Through the Gate

We embark up the dirt road, that could easily have been driven, but we wanted to know how far it was to walk the whole way.  Also, this trip was about getting out and enjoying the weather, not sitting in a truck until we got to some place.  You miss out on a lot of the benefit of doing something like this if you drive the whole way.

Robin Hood Lake
Robin Hood Lake Camp

A short distance up the road we came to a few houses with nearly a dozen trucks parked in the driveways.  We met a man coming up the road who was Read the rest of this entry »

Hello again!

I figured a new post was in order as it is taking longer than expected to put together the story of the Boundary Rock Expedition earlier in the month.  As far as you knew, I went off in search of Boundary Rock, and never returned.  This post will not be about the trip, but will serve more as an appetiser, a promise that it is on it’s way and maybe a bit of a diversion to buy me more time to finish the photo essay detailing the trip.

In the past few weeks much has happened here.  Since the trip, I have moved to Fredericton, New Brunswick and am settling in here nicely.  The public library is displaying photography of New Brunswick waterfalls which has inspired me to do some more exploring.  The difference here is that it’s all new to me.  I know Fredericton well, but the surrounding area is still uncharted territory.  So, I became inspired by this display and found the lovely blog:  Waterfalls of New Brunswick.  I have spent the last week or so exploring the region, mostly searching for these waterfalls and hiking through the outskirts of Fredericton and the beauty of it amazes me.  This being said, I would like to expand the focus of this blog to the maritime provinces, as I am no longer a resident of Nova Scotia (although in my heart it will always be home) and now I will begin to explore some places that are new to me.

Now, you’ve probably come to this site to see some photos, and certainly not to hear me babble on…  so let’s cut to the chase, shall we?

Retired Row Boat

Retired Row Boat

A boat, left alongside a river near Port Elgin, NB, fades away into the long grass.

Abandoned PEI

Abandoned NB - In the Shadow

Driving along the road from Shediac to the Confederation Bridge and on to Charlottetown there are an incredible number of abandoned houses.  I was here picking up my sister from University, so I didn’t have all day to explore, but I did manage to stop and get Read the rest of this entry »

Abandoned Annapolis

April 3, 2009

With the start date of the Boundary Rock trip drawing nearer, Cody and I took a drive down to the put in site to check out the condition of the roads and the ice.  Along the way, we made a few stops to explore some abandoned houses in some of the more remote rural parts of South Western Nova Scotia.  We ran into some pretty messy roads along the way, and some ice still on the lakes, but we’re not ready to give up yet.  There is still time for the ice to melt and the channels are opening up.  So here is a photo essay of sorts of our adventures on the back roads of South Western Nova Scotia:

Windsor Wear - Paul Maybee

Windsor Wear - Paul Maybee

I spotted this from the highway and decided to pull in to get a closer look.  I loved the look of the old bricks with arched windows.  I thought this was abandoned, but when we got closer, we could see people working inside and it obviously has all new windows.  It’s nice to see something like this being restored for a new purpose.  Such a beautiful old building.  Is it for offices?  loft apartments?  Either way, this one doesn’t technically count, because it’s not abandoned.  It’s just being given a new life.   …and we’re back on the road:

Abandoned - Paul Maybee

Abandoned - Paul Maybee

Abandoned: New Minas - Paul Maybee

Abandoned: New Minas - Paul Maybee

The next thing I saw from the road, was this old farmhouse on top of a hill.  I pulled in to try and get a better look, and we decided to stop in for coffee at the Just Us cafe.  After fueling up on coffee, we continued up the road to try and find Read the rest of this entry »

Cat in Window - Paul Maybee

Cat in Window - Paul Maybee

This photo is from Ecuador and is of our beloved “house” cat, Maria Pachita, or Pacha.  I’m choosing this photo today, because my brother Dave is in Mexico today (where there is no ice on the lakes) and I thought we could all use a little bit of sunshine around here too.  Hope you’re having a blast!!  Happy Birthday!

photo of the day

March 11, 2009

Hoodies - Paul Maybee

Hoodies - Paul Maybee

This photo is one of my personal favorites of the Ecuador trip in 2002.  This is just after we had reached the ‘top’ of pichincha and turned around to look down at the city of Quito.  I say ‘top’ becuase if we look up, we can still see another peak above where we stood here, but this was the ‘top’ as it appeared from the ground.  The clouds had cleared for us to have a great view, but they were moving in again, and fast, so we couldn’t stay on top of the world for long before we made the descent – which was much quicker than the climb.

Otovalo Woman - Paul Maybee

Otovalo Woman - Paul Maybee

This is a photo of a woman in Otovalo, Ecuador in 2002.  In honor of International Womens Day I wanted to post this photo of this beautiful Ecuadorian woman.  She had asked me for some money and so I offered to give her some money if she would let me take a photo of her.  I told her that I though she was beautiful and her face just lit up, which really makes the photo I think.

photo of the day

March 3, 2009

Blue House, Ecuador 2002 - Paul Maybee

Blue House, Ecuador 2002 - Paul Maybee

This photo is of a house in Ecuador I took while there for 3 months in 2002.  I went there after my first year of University to stay with my brother, Dave, who lived there at the time.  This photo was taken in the South end of Quito city near where we lived.  It is near the clover-leaf traffic circle on the way out of town.  For more photos of my trip to Ecuador, visit my Flickr site.

There are many versions of the story of Jim Charles, like any good story that has been told around campfires for many generations.  A great version of the story appears in Mike Parker’s book, “Wood Chips and Beans” and another good version comes from a blog by “the nature writer”, Laurie Lacey.  Basically the story goes like this:

Jim Charles was a man who lived in the Kejimikujik area in the 1800’s.  He was one of the most skilled of the guides in those woods and frequently took sporting fishermen and hunters deep into the woods where the fishing and game hunting were prime.  He and his wife lived on what is now known as Jim Charles Point on the Kejimikujik Lake.  Jim had discovered a gold mine deep in what is now the Tobeatic wilderness and became quite rich.  Now the men in the village became jealous of Jim Charles’ fortune and tried to get information about the location of this gold mine which he kept a secret.  One night a man became quite forceful with Jim at a bar when he refused to give up the location and picked a fight with him.  Jim knocked the man clean off his feet and several hours later, the man was dead.

It should be mentioned now that Jim Charles was a Mi’kmaq man and though he was well respected within the community, there was no guarantee of a fair trial with the murder of a white man hanging over his head.  So Jim did the only thing he knew to do and took to the woods.

jimcharlesrock1

Jim Charles Rock

Photo Courtesy of Nova Scotia Archives and Records Management

Reference Number: N-2516/ Album 43, #2

Author’s Note: It is mentioned in other online sources that this is Boundary Rock.  It is not.  This is what I believe is Jim Charles’ Rock.  Boundary Rock is much smaller than this rock as is apparent from the size of the man standing in the bottom right hand corner of the photo.  It is believed that this photo was taken by J.A. Irvine in 1899.

It is said that Jim Charles stayed in those woods for years.  He stayed in there for fear that the men of the village were looking for him.  He hid under a enormous rock, where there was a cave underneath, and from on top of which he could see anyone coming from miles around.  This is what’s now referred to as Jim Charles’ Rock.  It is said that it is near Cofan Camp on the Sand Beach Lake, but like the Boundary Rock, little is know as to its whereabouts.  He also never returned to his gold mine, for fear that the ghost of the man he killed was haunting it.  Also, he had no need for gold unless he could spend it, which would require him returning to town.

Some of the stories about Jim Charles claim that he did in fact return to town and stood trial and was found not guilty for the murder of the man.  Some say he never returned from the wilderness.  Whichever is true, the fact is that the exact location of the mine, and the rock died with Jim Charles.

So we will spend a day on our trip to search for Jim Charles’ Rock.  Here is a draft of our itinerary as it stands now:

trip itinerary - The Search for Boundary Rock

trip itinerary - The Search for Boundary Rock